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Inspiration Board : Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective

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The Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) has quickly become one of my favorite places to go. Nestled in the Berkshire Mountains in North Adams, Massachusetts, the museum occupies 13 acres of grounds and encompasses a vast complex of 26 buildings (many of them converted 19th-century factory buildings) that house a plethora of fabulous pieces of art—many so large that they simply cannot fit in traditional gallery spaces.

Currently on view through 2033(!) is an impressive retrospective of the wall drawings of artist Sol LeWitt. Massive in scale, this exhibit consists of 105 large-scale drawings that span the artist's career from 1969 to 2007. It occupies three floors of a 27,000 square foot mill building specially renovated for the show and is the result of an amazing collaboration between Yale University Art Gallery, the Williams College Museum of Art, and MASS MoCA.

Sol LeWitt is perhaps best known for separating the act of conceiving a work of art from the act of executing it, an approach to art-making he outlined most concisely in his 1967 statement: "The idea becomes the machine that makes the art." If you are not familiar with Sol LeWitt's work and the conceptually based approach to art-making that he and other artists pioneered in the 1960s, you might enjoy knowing how LeWitt came to make his wall drawings, which were first described with concise language and clear diagrams that he and/or others could apply directly to specific walls in any give location (as has been done with this exhibit).

Check out a few of my pictures from the exhibit below. And if you find yourself in North Adams any time over the next 22 years, be sure to check it out. The immense size and scope of this work, not to mention the richness of its color and form, are sure to inspire you!

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