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Make It : Owlies

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Today's guest post was written by our friend Sarah Goldschadt, who has been known to get crafty from time to time.

Sarah's friends have just written a sweet book where all the projects are miniature, but don't underestimate the punch of these pint-size crafts. That would be a big mistake. Big. Huge.

"Hi Everyone!

I'm so excited to have a few projects featured in Microcrafts (where every craft is smaller than a spool of thread!) from Quirk Books. The book features 25 art and craft projects compiled by Alicia Kachmar, Margaret McGuire, Katie Hatz, and friends. One of the projects featured in the book are my mini owls! And guess what? Now you can make your own:

Don’t let pretty scraps of fabric go to waste. Dainty owlies can be made out of any three-inch cotton square.

Supplies

  • tracing paper
  • disappearing fabric marker
  • two 3-inch square scraps of fabric (one print and one solid)
  • scissors
  • sewing machine or needle and thread
  • bamboo skewer (optional)
  • embroidery thread and needle
  • polyester fiberfill
Back
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Trace the owl pattern onto tracing paper and cut out the shape.  Then trace the pattern twice onto the wrong side of the fabric (for the front and back).  Cut out the fabric pieces.

1 Trace the owl pattern onto tracing paper and cut out the shape. Then trace the pattern twice onto the wrong side of the fabric (for the front and back). Cut out the fabric pieces.

With right sides facing, sew together the fabric pieces using a 1/8 -inch seam allowance.  Leave the opening unsewn as marked on the pattern.

2 With right sides facing, sew together the fabric pieces using a 1/8 -inch seam allowance. Leave the opening unsewn as marked on the pattern.

Turn right-side out through the opening; use a pointed object like a bamboo skewer to push out the corners.

3 Turn right-side out through the opening; use a pointed object like a bamboo skewer to push out the corners.

Make the beak by folding down the triangle. Use 2 straight stitches of embroidery thread to secure it to the front, sewing through the tip of the triangle and 1 layer of the body fabric.  Knot the thread on the inside of the beak.

4 Make the beak by folding down the triangle. Use 2 straight stitches of embroidery thread to secure it to the front, sewing through the tip of the triangle and 1 layer of the body fabric. Knot the thread on the inside of the beak.

Mark spots for the eyes using the fabric marker. Use embroidery thread and small straight stitches to make the eyes; knot the thread on the inside.

5 Mark spots for the eyes using the fabric marker. Use embroidery thread and small straight stitches to make the eyes; knot the thread on the inside.

Stuff the body and fold in the bottom edge. Double thread a needle and sew a running stitch along the bottom. Gather the ends and secure with a knot.

6 Stuff the body and fold in the bottom edge. Double thread a needle and sew a running stitch along the bottom. Gather the ends and secure with a knot.

Sew on a loop of embroidery thread to make owls into ornaments you can hang around the house or tie onto gift packages.

7 Sew on a loop of embroidery thread to make owls into ornaments you can hang around the house or tie onto gift packages.

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P.S. If you're in New York City this Saturday, October 22, head over to the Microcrafts event at Pins & Needles for some snack and crafts from 3-5 PM."

Thanks, Sarah!

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